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Posts Tagged ‘Ironwood Forest National Monument’

Learn more about the history of CSDP on this new podcast episode!

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On May 12, 2019, CSDP Executive Director Carolyn Campbell was interviewed by Amanda Shauger for the “30 minutes” program on local community radio station KXCI 91.3 FM. Over the half-hour show, Carolyn and Amanda discuss the history of the Coalition, the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan, and what we’re working on these days. Topics covered include how and why the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan came to be, protecting Sonoran Desert wildlife linkages, our fight against the Rosemont Mine and Interstate 11, our Critter Cam program, and more! 

The full show can be listened to at:

https://kxci.org/podcast/coalition-for-sonoran-desert-protection/

Thanks for all your support over the last 21 years! 

Stand up for Avra Valley!

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One of the Coalition’s supporters, Rick Brown, wrote this beautiful and powerful poem in defense of Avra Valley. Take a moment to sit with Rick’s commanding words about what we stand to lose if Interstate 11 is built at the doorstep to Saguaro National Park and other irreplaceable public lands. Thank you, Rick, for YOUR voice on behalf of the wildlife and wild places of the Sonoran Desert. 
 
Stand Up for Avra Valley! 
 
Midst a scenic desert valley
a freeway is planned to flow 
more useless sprawl and chaos
whose outcome we all know
 
This Sonoran panorama
is a treat for jaded eyes
seducing all who view her
‘neath those brilliant blue skies
 
A first trip to this landscape
will cause your heart to flutter
with glimpses of Arizona
before it fills with clutter 
 
A treasured realm of nature
spreads forth in grand repose
dotted with tall Saguaro
in their striking graceful pose 
 
Vistas that stir our conscience
abound from this great place
Tucson Mountain to Ironwood
are gifts you can NOT replace
 
Sacred and spiritual 
historic and sublime
Avra’s cultural essence
is the ideal paradigm
 
But greed, wealth, and pressure
fueled by backroom politics
keep Avra on the radar
with puzzling little tricks
 
It’s just another freeway
more miles of stark concrete 
What could possibly happen
when the Interstate’s complete?
 
Bulldozers by the hundreds 
would scour this mighty plain
by tearing it asunder
in a militant campaign
 

Noise, glare, and vibration 
would be the new calling card

gone are her days of wonder
left tattered, torn, and scarred
 
Thousands of tiny boxes
will rise from scattered seeds 
strewn across this basin
like machine-built tumbleweeds
 
Gridlock and more congestion
will become regular routine
Drivers could not imagine
this place was once serene
 
Destroying creation’s realm
when alternatives exist
is heinous to the utmost
and why we must resist
 
Foundations are in place
without building yet anew
along present corridors
much less-costly to pursue
 
Floodplain and water sources
occupy this narrow route
Why build amid these features
posing danger, risk, and doubt?
 
Our duty is to save her
from harbingers of doom
By protecting this fine Eden
she’ll forever stay abloom
 
Stand up for Avra Valley
let voices be overheard
It’s time to show the powerful
the passion of our words!
 
by R. Fleet Brown – 2018
 
 

Opposition to any proposed interstate in Avra Valley grows

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The recently convened I-11 Joint Stakeholder Community Planning Group has released a press release and position statement opposing any proposed route for Interstate 11 in Avra Valley. The Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection is a proud leader of this new community stakeholder group. The full press release is below:

Citizens Convened by Federal and State Highway Departments Strongly Oppose Highway in Avra Valley

Stakeholders find Common Ground in Downtown Route to Create a Sustainable City

Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) and the Federal Highway Administration (FHwA) recently convened representatives of several stakeholder organizations in a process to explore two alternative routes for the proposed Interstate 11 through Pima County. Stakeholders have developed a consensus position that re-designing I-10 and I-19 to accommodate co-location with I-11 could have a positive effect on downtown revitalization, while stating strong opposition to an “I-10 bypass” in Avra Valley. See letter here. “A freeway that borders Tucson Mountain Park, Tohono O’odham tribal lands, Saguaro National Park, and Ironwood Forest National Monument makes absolutely zero sense,” stated Carolyn Campbell, Executive Director of the Coalition for Sonoran Desert Protection. “The direct and cumulative effects of a freeway to these natural and cultural iconic places of the Sonoran Desert simply cannot be mitigated. This route should not be under consideration.”

Stakeholders believe that there are shortcomings associated with the federal review process that focuses on new highway construction.  However, “we believe that there could be a significant opportunity to address some of the historic negative consequences that resulted from the construction of I-10,” said Gene Einfrank, Menlo Park Neighborhood Association President. “The building of I-10 physically divided our community and diminished the quality of life of our downtown and other neighborhoods along the highway. Instead of simply adding new lanes to our existing highway, we should consider redesigning portions of it—either going underground or suspended—so that we can reconnect our city.” 

Moreover, stakeholders encourage a broader look at future transportation options, focusing on changes to the management of the existing highway to reduce congestion, including pricing, scheduling, and other programs; technologies that improve traffic flows; and enhancements to the rail system, including light rail and intermodal transportation.

The group recommends ADOT and FHwA refer to the I-11 Super Corridor study final document, which was submitted to ADOT in 2016, to draw inspiration on a comprehensive design. The Sustainable Cities Lab, hosted at the UA College of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture, completed this transdisciplinary study on the I-11 corridor along with Arizona State University and University of Nevada, Las Vegas. UA’s study area focused on opportunities from Marana to south of downtown Tucson. Their outcomes incorporate the addition of light and heavy rail, walking, cycling, new technology for controlling traffic as well as incorporating alternative forms of energy production and transportation.

Have a Beer for a Bighorn on November 18th!

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The Coalition, Friends of Ironwood Forest, Sierra Club, and The Wilderness Society are hosting a fun event on November 18, 2017 to support Ironwood Forest National Monument. Will you join us in having a beer for a bighorn? 

What: Have a Beer for a Bighorn Event

When: November 18, 2017, 3-7pm

Where: Dragoon Brewing Company, 1859 W. Grant Rd., #111

Details: There will be information available about Ironwood Forest National Monument, food trucks, brewery tours, snacks, and a slide show!

A pdf flyer about the event can be downloaded here. Please share with your friends and other community members who care about the Ironwood Forest National Monument! 

We hope to see you there!

 

Speak out in support of the Antiquities Act and our National Monuments!

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The Antiquities Act and our National Monuments are under assault in Congress and we need your help!

Ragged Top in the Ironwood Forest National Monument would not be protected without the Antiquities Act. Speak up today to support our public lands!

Earlier this month, Utah Representative Rob Bishop introduced HR 3990, the “National Monument Creation and Protection Act” and it passed out of the House Natural Resources Committee on October 11, 2017 (23 in support, 17 against).

This bill would GUT the Antiquities Act. According to the Sierra Club, the four main takeaways of the bill are:

1. It changes the definition of what qualifies as deserving of protection. Artifacts and buildings are in, items of scientific importance and natural objects are definitely out.
2. It places restrictions on the size of monuments. Anything over 85,000 acres definitely can’t be a monument. National monuments between 10,000 and 85,000 acres require approval from state legislatures and governors, which has been known to take decades.
3. It includes language that explicitly permits the president to rescind a national monument, totally undercutting the Administration and Bishop’s arguments that the Antiquities Act as currently written already allows the president to get rid of a monument.
4. It completely prohibits the creation of marine monuments under the Antiquities Act.

Will you contact your Representative and express your opposition to HR3990?

Please let your representative know why you support our national monuments, those that are protected today and potential ones in the future.

For an excellent editorial by Coalition supporter and Friends of Ironwood Forest Board Member Bill Thornton about why we need to protect the Antiquities Act, head here

We don’t know yet when HR 3990 will be debated and voted on in the House of Representatives so check back for an update – we’ll post one here when we know more.

Thank you for speaking out and using your voice to make a difference!

Take Action: Submit your comments today in support of our national monuments!

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May 16, 2017

On April 25, 2017, President Trump signed an Executive Order that ordered the Interior Department to conduct a review of national monuments designated since 1996. According to a press release issued by the National Parks Conservation Association:

This executive order targets the Antiquities Act of 1906, which permits presidents to declare federal lands, already owned by all Americans, as monuments in order to protect their historical, cultural or scientific value and overall national significance. The review specifically calls for Interior to review sites that are more than 100,000 acres, or where Interior Secretary Zinke determines the designation or expansion was made without “adequate public outreach and coordination with relevant stakeholders.”

Our national parks and monuments are economic generators. America’s national parks welcomed a record-setting 331 million visitors last year, that contributed nearly $35 billion to the U.S. economy. Today, the Outside Industry Association released their annual economic report that shows that the outdoor recreation economy generates $887 billion in consumer spending annually and sustains 7.6 million American jobs. Altering monument designations would negatively impact what is proven to be good for local businesses and communities across the country.

Nearly every president since 1906 (eight republicans and eight democrats) has used the Antiquities Act as a bipartisan conservation tool to protect our nation’s history and culture. The law was passed by a Republican-led Congress and signed by President Theodore Roosevelt. There are more than 150 monuments that protect America’s cultural, historical, and natural heritage for future generations. Notably, no president has attempted to revoke a predecessor’s monument designation.

In Arizona, the review covers four national monuments: Ironwood Forest, Sonoran Desert, Grand Canyon-Parashant, and Vermilion Cliffs. All four of these national monuments protect stunning landscapes that are home to hundreds of wildlife species and important cultural sites. They also provide quiet open spaces where American citizens can find solace, view wildlife, and connect with the natural world. 

Please submit your comment today that expresses support for all our national monuments and urges Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke to not make any changes to our currently designated national monuments. 

Our national monuments belong to all Americans. They are part of the legacy we are leaving for future generations. We need to fight for them today. 

How do you submit comments?

Comments can be submitted directly to the Interior Department here:

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/05/11/2017-09490/review-of-certain-national-monuments-established-since-1996-notice-of-opportunity-for-public-comment#

There is also information at the site above on how to submit comments by mail.

What is the comment deadline?

There are two comment deadlines. Comments on Bears Ears National Monument must be submitted by May 26, 2017. Comments related to all other national monuments under review must be submitted by July 10, 2017. 

For a thought-provoking Guest Editorial about why President Trump should visit Arizona’s national monuments by Sierra Club-Grand Canyon Chapter Director Sandy Bahr, published in the AZ Daily Star on May 23, 2017, head here

For the Coalition’s comment letter in support of Ironwood Forest National Monument, and all national monuments, head here

Thank you for supporting our national monuments, and especially Ironwood Forest National Monument in southern Arizona.

Did you know that the Coalition led the effort, with our community partners, to have Ironwood Forest National Monument (IFNM) designated in 2000? IFNM is 129,000 acres of rugged Sonoran Desert habitat that contains an incredible diversity of wildlife species. Our member group, Friends of Ironwood Forest, has more information about IFNM at their website. You can also check out a recent news story about IFNM, including an interview with Friends of Ironwood Forest Board President Tom Hannagan, here