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Posts Tagged ‘Oracle Road wildlife bridge’

CSDP and the Oracle Road wildlife crossings featured on national news!

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On Saturday, April 27, a new show on NBC, “1st Look,” aired a segment after Saturday Night Live about the Coalition and our work on the Oracle Road wildlife crossings. Coalition Conservation Science Director Jessica Moreno spent a long day in the field with the crew and host of the show, Johnny Bananas, in mid-March showing them the Oracle Road wildlife crossings, looking for a collared mule deer, tracking down a tortoise outfitted with a radio telemetry device, showing off one of our wildlife cameras, and more. Scientists from Arizona Game and Fish Department joined us for part of the day, along with Coalition volunteer and superstar Kathie Schroeder and her hawk Sueño. You can view the full 6-minute segment HERE or by clicking on the image below.  

And a huge thank you to all our community science volunteers and supporters that have been instrumental to this project and volunteer program! 

New interactive case study about the Oracle Road wildlife crossings

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A new interactive case study about the Oracle Road wildlife crossings was just launched through the work of the Desert Landscape Conservation Cooperative. This case study features both a 2-page summary and an interactive map with more detailed information. You can check out the case study at https://arcg.is/09arn8 or look at it in the box below. [In the box below, click on the blue left and right arrows at the bottom to access the different sections of the case study. Within each section, click on the blue “i” in the top right corner to read the narrative about each section.] And thank you for all your support for this innovative project!

 

Sonoran Desert wildlife linkages featured in Desert Leaf magazine

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CSDP Conservation Science Director Jessica Moreno published a new article in the most recent edition of the Desert Leaf magazine. Jessica’s article provides a fantastic summary of the history of wildlife linkages protection in Pima County’s Sonoran Desert, along with anecdotes and reflections on both black bears and Sonoran Desert tortoises and why they both need connected wildlife linkages to thrive.

Like black bears, tortoises have plant-based eating preferences. They also have few natural predators, can roam with compass-like precision and determination over hundreds of miles, and hibernate in the cold months. Tortoises get most of their water from the plants they eat, carrying it in canteen-like bladders. (Handling a tortoise can cause it to become anxious, pee, and thereby lose an entire summer’s water supply.) Roads and development are perilous hazards for them. But with thoughtful planning and community support, the threats posed by these hazards can be reduced or eliminated. In addition, safe crossings and open spaces benefit more than fuzzy bunnies, tortoises, and bears; they provide a beautiful, thriving, and resilient place for us to live.

The full article is available here.

And the full issue of the Desert Leaf magazine can be found at this website

Great work, Jessica! 

 

 

 

Oracle Road Wildlife Bridge named for former Pima County Supervisor Ann Day

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Aerial photo of the Ann Day Memorial Wildlife Bridge taken shortly after construction finished. Photo by Thomas Wiewandt.

 

The Oracle Road wildlife bridge has a new name. On August 8, 2018, the Arizona State Board on Geographic and Historic Names approved the re-naming of the Sonoran Desert’s first wildlife bridge to the Ann Day Memorial Wildlife Bridge. Ann Day served as a Pima County Supervisor from 2000 to 2012 and was a champion of the Sonoran Desert Conservation Plan. Supervisor Day valued wildlife, protected open spaces, and building wildlife crossings throughout her tenure and service. She was tragically killed in a car accident inn May 2016 just days before the wildlife bridge was officially opened at a community celebration on May 10, 2016.

We are proud and gratified that Ann Day’s name will live on, both in the annals of Pima County history and as the official name for this important wildlife bridge that is keeping wildlife safe and reconnecting one of our critical wildlife linkages.

For more information, please read the Pima County press release and an article in the Arizona Daily Star.